Contest: Become a TED Fellow [TED]

TED: Ideas Worth Spreading

TED has just announced its 2009 Fellows Program, a new international program designed to foster the spread of great ideas.

Initially 50 individuals, selected for the world-changing potential of their work, will be invited to participate in the TED community each year. At the end of the year, 20 of
these 50 will be selected to be TED Senior Fellows, participating in an extended three-year program which will bring them to six consecutive conferences, along with additional benefits. The principal goal of the program is to empower the Fellows to effectively communicate their work to the TED community and to the world.

The TED Fellows program will focus on attracting applicants living or working in five parts of the globe: the Asia/Pacific region, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Middle East — with consideration given to applicants from the rest of the world. TED will seek remarkable thinkers and doers that have shown unusual accomplishment, exceptional courage, moral imagination and the potential to increase positive change in their respective fields. The program focuses on innovators in technology, entertainment, design, science, film, art, music, entrepreneurship and the NGO community, among other pursuits.

For more information, go to http://www.ted.com/fellows.

Key application dates in 2009

About 25 fellows will be accepted for TED in Long Beach and TEDGlobal in Oxford. 100 fellows will be accepted for TEDIndia in Mysore.

Applications for TEDGlobal Fellows
Open: February 23, 2009
Due: March 23, 2009

Applications for TEDIndia Fellows
Open: April 20, 2009
Due: June 15, 2009

Applications for TED2010 Fellows
Open: August 3, 2009
Due: September 7, 2009

Hat-tip: Pablo H

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